Jul 102014
 

A content management system (CMS is a computer application that allows publishing, editing and modifying content, organizing, deleting as well as maintenance from a central interface. CMS’s are often used to run websites containing blogs, news, and shopping. Many corporate and marketing websites use CMS’s. CMS’s typically aim to avoid the need for hand coding, but may support it for specific elements or entire pages.

Some of the most famous open source CMS are Worpress (I use it to run linuxaria.com), Drupal and Joomla, they are (IMO) 3 old and solid CMS that can handle the majority of the needs, but there are much more open source CMS solutions and today I want to show you 4 less known solutions

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Jul 092014
 

Debian6lts
As probably most people know Debian has announced an extended support for Squeeze (AKA Debian 6), so while the “ordinary” support has ended on the 31 may 2014 there is now a Long Term Support (LTS) until the February 2016.
This has been announced by a team of volunteer on April

That’s a great news if you are not able to upgrade your server from Debian 6 to 7 and these are the instructions to do it easily.

Important: Squeeze-LTS will only support i386 and amd64. Users of other architectures are encouraged to upgrade to Debian 7 (“wheezy”).

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Jun 262014
 

Article first published on Urfix’s blog

The SCP protocol is a network protocol, based on the BSD RCP protocol, which supports file transfers between hosts on a network. SCP uses Secure Shell (SSH) for data transfer and utilizes the same mechanisms for authentication, thereby ensuring the authenticity and confidentiality of the data in transit. A client can send (upload) files to a server, optionally including their basic attributes (permissions, timestamps). Clients can also request files or directories from a server (download). SCP runs over TCP port 22 by default. Like RCP, there is no RFC that defines the specifics of the protocol.

SCP is an awesome tool. Learn it, Love it, Use it….
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Jun 242014
 

A not so common guide, article by   first posted on http://www.refining-linux.org

The UNIX philosophy is based on the DRY principle which declares: “Don’t repeat yourself”. Therefore, a program just does what it’s made for and uses libraries or even other programs on your system to do a more advanced job. Some of these auxiliary programs are user definable and probably you already know the EDITOR environment variable, which specifies your default editor for the console. This is used, e.g., for the command visudo, which opens your /etc/sudoers file safely, or by svn to input a commit comment. But another important component is your console pager, which is used to display textual content on the console.

As a system administrator or a more advanced Linux user you surely know man and how to use it. man shows you the (probably localized) contents of your system’s manual pages for a specific command or file, at least you might think so, but actually that’s wrong or let’s say: not completely the truth. man selects which manpage to show, but the display itself is managed by your pager. Of course, not only man makes use of the pager, also commands like mail use it (which might not exist on your system if you don’t have an MTA installed), so this is a very basic program.

I assume, you have already used your pager very often, which is nothing else than more, less or lv (which is also a good pager but very seldom installed by default and therefore rarely known). Most of the time, you use them to display the contents of log files or configurations, which you don’t want to alter, but that’s not all. As mentioned before, other programs use your pager as well and there is a way to configure which one to take and of course also how to use it.

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Jun 192014
 

rhel

Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) is a GNU/Linux distribution developed by Red Hat and targeted toward the commercial market.

Around 1 week ago the version 7 of Red Hat Enterprise has been released, and there seem to be great and interesting news in this version of the most used Gnu/Linux Enterprise distribution, let’s see some of them:

  • Linux Containers
  • XFS filesystems
  • Performance management
  • All the rest

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