May 212014
 

Original article by Linux Brigade

Ever have to check a list of Linux servers for various things like what version of CentOS they’re running, maybe how long each has been running to get an uptime report? You can and it’s very easy to get going with it with the command gsh

Group Shell (also called gsh) is a remote shell multiplexor. It lets you control many remote shells at once in a single shell. Unlike other commands dispatchers, it is interactive, so shells spawned on the remote hosts are persistent.
It requires only a SSH server on the remote hosts, or some other way to open a remote shell.
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May 022014
 

You could have come across the term, “cPanel” if you have been searching around for a shared Linux web hosting or logged into cPanel right now if have got a new hosting account. cPanel is a web-based tool that can help you manage the files on your website, email associated with your domain, and basically manage almost everything about your hosting. It is extremely user-friendly and can enable one to manage their hosting even if you they do not know much about web hosting.

There are several alternatives to cPanel like, Webmin, Virtualmin, and Zpanel, but cPanel simply blows its competitors out of the water, because of it user-friendly interface and features. When you sign up for a shared web hosting for your online business or personal websites, 99.9% of the time you will have cPanel to help you manage your hosting. Although, a lot of professionals like to use a console to get things done, which can give you major geek credits, for someone who is just starting out in the world of hosting, learning the basics about cPanel is probably the first step to accomplish tasks quicker.
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Apr 302012
 

Varnish is an open source “web accelerator” which you can use to speed up your website.

It can cache certain static elements, such as images or javascript but you can also use it for other purposes such as Load balancing or some additional security, in general most of the people want to try it and test their website to see if it’s really so amazing (IMO yes, but test it yourself).

The traditional guides will tell you to move your webserver to another port, perhaps 81,8080 or just bind to localhost, configure Varnish to listen to port 80 and use the web server as backend, the server where Varnish will forward requests not found in his cache.

This is the “normal” configuration and it works fine, but sometimes you just want to make a quick Test or perhaps you are using a Control Panel, such as Cpanel, Kloxo or ISPConfig and in my experience change the standard listening ports of Apache is not a decision to be taken lightly with these tools.

So in a VPS (with Kloxo) I’ve used a different approach: iptables.
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