Aug 252013
 

Recently I installed a Debian 7 VPS on Linode and as first thing I wanted to do an update of the system, but I found a small problem in doing this :

# apt-get update
0% [Connecting to ftp.us.debian.org (2610:148:1f10:3::89)] [Connecting to security.debian.org (2607:ea00:101:3c0b:207:e9ff:fe00:e595)]
Get:1 http://ftp.us.debian.org wheezy Release.gpg [1,672 B]                                                                           
...
Get:15 http://security.debian.org wheezy/updates/main Translation-en [56.6 kB]
Fetched 16.3 MB in <strong>4min 0s</strong> (67.5 kB/s)                                                                                                                                     
Reading package lists... Done

So 4 minutes to just update my repositories (and I had just the default for a Debian 7 just installed), this is due to the fact that linode VPS are IPV6 ready and so the servers of this company try to connect to security.debian.org via its IPv6 address by default when running apt-get update, and that results in having to wait for a lengthy timeout whenever you try to download updates of any sort.

But luckily change the system so apt-get will use IPV4 it’s not so hard.
Continue reading »

flattr this!

Jul 282013
 

Article By Oussama Krifa

Accessing your home computer (I’ll call it server on this article) from a remote location (that I’ll call client) outside the local network, can be very interesting, for example, listening to streaming music played by MPD, managing downloads in the bittorrent client Transmission through its web interface, controlling the machine via SSH … However, before accessing your server remotely, you must know the “address” or IP (Internet Protocol address), but generally at home they are provided dynamically, through the Internet Service Provider, so it’s not so easy to know the IP of your home server.
We will see how to automatically update the DNS name on a domain name server (DynDNS) with the current IP address of the server thanks to ddclient. Continue reading »

flattr this!

Aug 312012
 

A name server is a server that hosts a network service for providing responses to queries against a directory service. It maps a human-recognizable identifier to a system-internal, identification or addressing component, the program BIND is the most famous name server available on Linux, it can be used to do everything you need from a name server, but sometimes you need less.

Maybe you have a VPS and you want just to manage your DNS name, for this use you could check NSD a great alternative to BIND, it does not do DNS forwarding, it only serves its own domains. but this could be enough for your project.

NSD uses BIND-style zone-files; zone-files used under BIND (named) can usually be supplied unmodified in NSD once declared in the nsd.conf configuration. NSD manages zone information compiled via ‘zonec’ into a binary database file (nsd.db) which allows lightning fast start up of the NSD name-service daemon, syntax structural verification and flagging of errors at database compile-time. All this before being made available to NSD service itself.

Let’s see how to install and configure it.

Continue reading »

flattr this!