Sep 132014
 

Systemd
Article by Stuart Burns first posted on Openlogic.com

With Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 released and CentOS version 7 newly unveiled, now is a good time to cover systemd, the replacement for legacy System V (SysV) startup scripts and runlevels. Red Hat-based distributions are migrating to systemd because it provides more efficient ways of managing services and quicker startup times. With systemd there are fewer files to edit, and all the services are compartmentalized and stand separate from each other. This means that should you screw up one config file, it won’t automatically take out other services.

Systemd has been the default system and services manager in Red Hat Fedora since the release of Fedora 15, so it is extensively field-tested. It provides more consistency and troubleshooting ability than SysV – for instance, it will report if a service has failed, is suspended, or is in error. Perhaps the biggest reason for the move to systemd is that it allows multiple services to start up at the same time, in parallel, making machine boot times quicker than they would be with legacy runlevels.

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Sep 082014
 

Guest post by Sophie Davidson

Modern day criminals are no longer entering banks with ski masks and pistols. Today’s felons are moving into cyberspace to accomplish their nefarious goals.

Remember the old adage, “a criminal always returns to the scene of the crime”? It turns out this maxim holds a lot of weight with regards to DDoS cybercrime.

Double DDoS

Recent research from BT revealed that about 41% of online businesses surveyed were victims of DDoS in the last 12 months. The more notable findings of the research showed that, of those attacked, over 78 percent were subsequently hit a second time shortly thereafter.

Distributed Denial of Service attacks or DDoS encompass a large variety of cyber threats designed to overwhelm a target’s server, or jam up their network. By disrupting a target’s resources, the hackers succeed in preventing normal traffic (such as users or customers) from passing through.

The effects of these attacks are potentially devastating. After being hit by a strong attack, it takes on average at least 12 hours to offer full service back to users.

What can happen in 12 hours? This sort of disruption could mean losing hundreds of thousands of dollars in revenue. Or, perhaps worse, the trust between the user and the online business, built up over months or years, could be lost in a matter of minutes.
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Aug 312014
 

Some time ago I posted an article about shelr.tv a website and a service that was made to allow you to share your terminal records directly from the website.

Now the website of shelr.tv seems dead and so I’ve took a look around to see if there are similar websites and I’ve found commands.com.

For what I can see from their homepage it’s a service similar to the other, so let’s test it.
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Aug 282014
 

Article by Himanshu Arora first posted on http://mylinuxbook.com/

Sometimes a computer system is connected to so many file-systems (in parallel) that managing these connections becomes a complex task. If a user’s work involves interacting with local, external and remote file-systems then he/she would definitely feel a need for a connection management software to manage all the connections centrally.

Looking for a simple connection manager? Try out Gigolo.

gigolo-main

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Aug 242014
 

While I was looking around for some review of recent linux distribution I found this nice blog: http://mylinuxexplore.blogspot.it/ it’s a blog dedicated to Linux Distro review and for what I’ve read the articles are really well made and accurate, so in short take a look at this great blog by .

Here I’ve republished his last article by Zorin OS, a good distribution that I suggest to people that try for the first time Linux.

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Zorin OS has a lot of takers in the new Linux converts from Windows. Recently, Zorin OS released it’s 9th version based on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS with 5 years of support. For users who are familiar with Zorin, the release notes states of some incremental improvements over it’s predecessors, namely:

“We are excited to announce the release of Zorin OS 9 Core and Ultimate. The main focus for Zorin OS 9 has been on stability and the refinement of Zorin OS’ wide array of incredible features. Firstly, Zorin OS 9 includes a myriad of updated software and bug fixes to ensure that your computer runs better than ever. New applications such as the Firefox web browser and Rhythmbox music player have also been included in this release. EFI boot support has been added, making it easier to get Zorin OS on newer computers (64-bit only). In addition, we have introduced a new Blue desktop theme to the Zorin Theme Changer in complement to the Light and Dark themes. As Zorin OS 9 is based on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS you can expect to receive continuous software updates until 2019.”

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