Mar 302014
 

humble open source bundle
This week the Humble weekly Bundle has the subtitle “Celebrating Open source”, so I must buy and publish it :)
Apart the interesting title this bundle contains 8 nice games.

Each game in this bundle was made featuring some open source tool or library. Pay what you want for the high school-themed fantasy game, Magical Diary, the post-apocalyptic turn-based adventure game, NEO Scavenger (Early Access Game), the baby-throwing puzzle platformer, Offspring Fling!, and the visually stunning sci-fi combat game, Planet Stronghold. If you pay $6 or more, you’ll also get the whimsical 2-D puzzler, Anodyne, the tower defense and RPG hybrid, Defender’s Quest: Valley of the Forgotten, the 3-D action-adventure, Evoland, and the unique, limb-pulling adventure-puzzler, Incredipede.

The Humble Weekly Sale: Celebrating Open Source will only be here for one week. Grab this deal before it ends on Thursday, April 3, 2014 at 11:00 a.m. Pacific Time.

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Mar 162014
 

fitbit linux
I’ve recently received a fitbit flex as gift, and I love it, this personal device tracks steps, distance, and calories burned. At night, it tracks your sleep quality and wakes you silently in the morning. Just check out the lights to see how you stack up against your personal goal. Flex allows you to set a goal and uses LED lights to show how you’re stacking up. Each light represents 20% of your goal. You choose which one — steps, calories, or distance. It lights up like a scoreboard, challenging you to be more active day after day.

Flex automatically syncs your data to PCs and Macs with Fitbit’s wireless sync dongle (included), many iOS devices and select Android phones without plugging in or pushing buttons. Now all this sound fantastic and really funny if you like to take your stats and see nice graphs, but there is a small (big) problem about fitbit, it doesn’t support officially Linux.

Sure, you can use a compatible smartphone, but in general I like to use the idea of using my Linux computers for anything and with some research and some tests I’ve been able to sync successfully my flex with my Linux Mint 16.
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Mar 032014
 

Article by me, first published on Openlogic.com

Whether you are a system administrator or a developer, sometimes you need to consider the use of memory in GNU/Linux processes and programs. Memory is a critical resource, and limited memory plus processes that use a lot of RAM can cause a situation where the kernel goes out of memory (OOM). In this state Linux activates an OOM killer kernel process that attempts to recover the system by terminating one or more low-priority processes. Which processes the system kills is unpredictable, so though the OOM killer may keep the server from going down, it can cause problems in the delivery of services that should stay running.

In this article we’ll look at three utilities that report information about the memory used on a GNU/Linux system. Each has strengths and weaknesses, with accuracy being their Achilles’ heel. I’ll use CentOS 6.4 as my demo system, but these programs are available on any Linux distribution.

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Feb 032014
 

estranged1

Recently (16 Jan 2014 ) this free to play game has been released for Linux on Steam.

Estranged tells the story of a lone fisherman, whose ship is stranded on a mysterious island during a violent storm.

Explore the rich environments and meet the curious inhabitants of the island as you find a way back to the mainland.

Estranged: Act I is an action adventure game featuring horror elements.
The game features both puzzles and combat, as you try to make your way across to another part of the island. Estranged runs on the Source Engine with a few graphical extras.
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Jan 292014
 

Often one wants a shared access to files across machines. Traditionally one uses the network file system (nfs). The network file server works as follows: There is an nfs server that exports some directories in its filesystem hiearchy to various nfs clients that mount these directory over the network into their file system hierarchy. As a result, each of the clients shares the directories exported by the nfs server.

However a lot of times you just have to mount a directory from a server to your local computer and in these cases NFS it’s not so useful, sshfs it’s much better

Sshfs is a filesystem client based on the SSH File Transfer Protocol. Since most SSH servers already support this protocol it is very easy to set up: i.e. on the server side there’s nothing to do.  On the client side mounting the filesystem is as easy as logging into the server with ssh.

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