Aug 052014
 

whatpulse If, like me, you are a statistics freak you must install this small application on all your computers: WhatPulse

The software tracks a user’s pressed keys, mouse clicks and used bandwidth and the uptime of the system. Periodically, or by hand, the user can upload to the server the number of keystrokes made; this is called “pulsing”.

Users can see where they are in a leaderboard of people who have joined the program and compare themselves against people from their own countries. Users can also join teams, which enables them to compare themselves against people with similar interests (Go Linux Users !!).

There is a basic, and free, version where you can easily see and check all the basic statistics and a premium account where you can see some more stats.

The software is available for Linux, Windows and Mac.
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Feb 152013
 

As I wrote more than 2 years ago, the network tools (often referred as net-tools) ifconfig, netstat and route that should be familiar to anyone that has worked with a terminal, have been deprecated in favour of the iproute2 suite from some years.

iproute2 is intended to replace this entire suite of legacy Unix networking tools that were previously used for the tasks of configuring network interfaces, routing tables, and managing the ARP table, but which have not been developed since 2001.

You can find some examples of the usage of the iproute commands on my articles about:

- Policy routing
- Socket Statistics on Linux
- MAC Address Managment on Linux

And today I want to share with you some of the most useful commands that you can use with this “new” suite of commands and the translation of some old commands that we were all used to use on the terminal.
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Mar 032011
 

collectd In these days I have seen in a somewhat more detailed way collectd, an excellent tool for collecting statistics on various aspects of our Linux servers.

From Wikipedia: “collectd is a UNIX-daemon which collects, transfers and stores performance data of computers and network equipment. The acquired data is meant to help system administrators maintain an overview over available resources in order to detect existing or looming bottlenecks.

The first version of the daemon was written in 2005 by Florian Forster and has been further developed as free open-source project. Other developers have written improvements and extensions to the software that have been incorporated into the project. Most files of the source code are licensed under the terms of the GNU General Public License, version 2 (GPLv2), the remaining files are licensed under other open source licenses”

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