Jul 262015
 

Article by David Loth.

Have you heard of the latest movie streaming client on linux? The torrent community is buzz with latest open source movie streaming software born after that popcorntime has been closed. Popcorntime was a client based app for streaming movies for free.

Applications similar to it allows users to stream movies (with subtitles) and TV series, at no cost, and that may be illegal in your country so make sure you read the disclaimer before using Popcorn Time or any software related to it!
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Jul 102015
 

This is a re-post of the original article byJason SkowronskiAmy Echeverri and Sadequl Hussain first posted on http://www.loggly.com

Linux Logging Basics

First we’ll describe the basics of what Linux logs are, where to find them, and how they get created. If you already know this stuff, feel free to skip to the next section.

Linux System Logs

Many valuable log files are automatically created for you by Linux. You can find them in your /var/log directory. Here is what this directory looks like on a typical Ubuntu system:

Linux-system-log-terminal

Some of the most important Linux system logs include:

  • /var/log/syslog or /var/log/messages stores all global system activity data, including startup messages. Debian-based systems like Ubuntu store this in /var/log/syslog. RedHat-based systems like RHEL or CentOS store this in /var/log/messages.
  • /var/log/auth.log or /var/log/secure stores logs from the Pluggable Authentication Module (pam) including successful logins, failed login attempts, and authentication methods. Ubuntu and Debian store authentication messages in /var/log/auth.log. RedHat and CentOS store this data in /var/log/secure.
  • /var/log/kern stores kernel error and warning data, which is particularly helpful for troubleshooting custom kernels.
  • /var/log/cron stores information about cron jobs. Use this data to verify that your cron jobs are running successfully.

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Apr 122015
 

systemd is a suite of system management daemons, libraries, and utilities designed as a central management and configuration platform for the GNU/Linux computer operating system.
It provides a system and service manager that runs as PID 1 and starts the rest of the system as alternative to the traditional sysVinit.
systemd provides aggressive parallelization capabilities, uses socket and D-Bus activation for starting services, offers on-demand starting of daemons,

It’s becoming the standard of all the major GNU/Linux distributions and at the moment it’s the default for Arch Linux, Red Hat Enterprise/Centos (version 7), Fedora, Mageia and Suse Enterprise, it’s planned to be used on Debian 8 and Ubuntu 15.04.

There is a lot of people talking for and against systemd on the net as some see it as too intrusive, complex and against the Unix philosophy to keep things simple and make them do just one task.

Using Red Hat 7 at work and Arch Linux on my laptop I’ve started to use it and I must agree that it’s not so simple in the start, but let’s try to take the good thing from it and in this article I’d like to show you some commands that you can use with systemd to manage the processes on a GNU/Linux system and that I’ve found really useful.
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Apr 072015
 

mapsWe live in a day when having a map is a very important thing, but technology has advanced so much that we can literally enjoy having the most detailed maps in front of our eyes, be it on the computer or laptop. If you have Linux installed on your computer already, then it can be a refreshing and very interesting thing to do. With the help of the GNOME desktop environment and the new concept of GNOME Maps, all those much-needed maps are closer to us than they have ever been.

GNOME Maps is designed as a graphical front-end for the OpenStreetMap concept that has been created in JavaScript, so all those maps can be accessed from the browser like interface, which is a great and astounding achievement.

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Apr 052015
 

linux_steam
When it comes to gaming on a PC, Windows is pretty much the only operating system of choice suitable for the job. Sure, there are a few titles that can run on Linux at the moment, but the list is fairly thin. However, things may not stay this way for long, as Linux is making tremendous efforts to step into the game, with the upcoming SteamOS being the pièce de résistance. With no official released date available yet, Linux’s swing at Microsoft’s domination over the gaming industry may have to wait a bit longer. That doesn’t make its efforts any less remarkable, though, as Linux came a long way when it comes to gaming.
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