Apr 122015

systemd is a suite of system management daemons, libraries, and utilities designed as a central management and configuration platform for the GNU/Linux computer operating system.
It provides a system and service manager that runs as PID 1 and starts the rest of the system as alternative to the traditional sysVinit.
systemd provides aggressive parallelization capabilities, uses socket and D-Bus activation for starting services, offers on-demand starting of daemons,

It’s becoming the standard of all the major GNU/Linux distributions and at the moment it’s the default for Arch Linux, Red Hat Enterprise/Centos (version 7), Fedora, Mageia and Suse Enterprise, it’s planned to be used on Debian 8 and Ubuntu 15.04.

There is a lot of people talking for and against systemd on the net as some see it as too intrusive, complex and against the Unix philosophy to keep things simple and make them do just one task.

Using Red Hat 7 at work and Arch Linux on my laptop I’ve started to use it and I must agree that it’s not so simple in the start, but let’s try to take the good thing from it and in this article I’d like to show you some commands that you can use with systemd to manage the processes on a GNU/Linux system and that I’ve found really useful.
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Jun 102014

slackarchArticle by Velimir Baksa

On many sites there are a lot of information about Ubuntu or its successor, Mint, these distributions are excellent, very good for those who have never seen anything on Linux, but maybe someone could be more interested in having a greater freedom of action and try something that goes beyond a well-marked path, so what do you think of the GNU/Linux Arch and Slackware distributions ?

Many things are spoken around Arch and Slackware. And also many myths are around surrounding these two distributions, for someone they are hard to install, hard to use, hard for administration, good only for geeks.

Many myths about Arch/Slackware and I should say also Gentoo aren’t true. Both, Arch and Slackware, bring only the best to the operating system experience. BSD elegance and Linux kernel. Great customization, great user experience and unique philosophy. Today quality and simplicity don’t go together. But let’s take a look at some of the main aspects of a GNU/linux Distribution.
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Nov 162013


Recently I’ve discovered this project that has great ambitions:

arkOS is an open-source platform for securely self-hosting your online life.

Everything started from the founder Jacob Cook and the CitizenWeb Project he founded. It’s designed to run on a Raspberry Pi – a super-low-cost single board computer – and ultimately will let users, even of the non-technical variety, run from within their homes email, social networking, storage and other services that are increasingly getting shunted out into the cloud, and so under the control of big companies.

So in short arkOS is a lightweight Linux-based operating system that runs on a Raspberry Pi.

It allows you to easily host your own website, email, “cloud” and more, all within arm’s reach. It does this by interfacing with existing software and allowing the user to easily update and change settings with a graphical interface. No more need to depend on external cloud services, which can be insecure “walled gardens” that require you to give up control over your data.

arkOS will have several different components that come together to make a seamless self-hosting experience possible on your Raspberry Pi. Each of these components will work with each other out-of-the-box, allowing you to host your websites, email, social networking accounts, cloud services, and many other things from your arkOS node.

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