Oct 202014
 

linux-image

Guest post by Richard Larson

Linux often seems like a breath of fresh air to Windows users. It’s free. It doesn’t have bloatware issues. You don’t have to pay for it. It has less malware and hacking issues because it’s less profitable and productive for the baddies to concentrate on an operating system with less users.

Did I mention it doesn’t cost anything?

Whatever the reason Linux looks good to you, you have to remember that Linux and Windows are two different animals. Windows is far more professionally polished and noob friendly. (It has to be. You paid for it.) While there are a few supported versions of Windows floating around, most users stick with the one that comes with their machines. On the hand, Linux has so many distributions, it’s hard to keep track sometimes. From the way you install programs to the amount of time you spend in a command prompt screen, it’s a different experience. Whether it’s a good experience or not depends on your preference.

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Sep 302014
 

tux-terminal.jpg
Article by Daniel Miessler first posted on his blog

lsof is the sysadmin/security über-tool. I use it most for getting network connection related information from a system, but that’s just the beginning for this powerful and too-little-known application. The tool is aptly called lsof because it “lists openfiles“. And remember, in UNIX just about everything (including a network socket) is a file.

Interestingly, lsof is also the Linux/Unix command with the most switches. It has so many it has to use both minuses andpluses.

usage: [-?abhlnNoOPRstUvV] [+|-c c] [+|-d s] [+D D] [+|-f[cgG]]
 [-F [f]] [-g [s]] [-i [i]] [+|-L [l]] [+|-M] [-o [o]]
 [-p s] [+|-r [t]] [-S [t]] [-T [t]] [-u s] [+|-w] [-x [fl]] [--] [names]

As you can see, lsof has a truly staggering number of options. You can use it to get information about devices on your system, what a given user is touching at any given point, or even what files or network connectivity a process is using.

For me, lsof replaces both netstat and ps entirely. It has everything I get from those tools and much, much more. So let’s look at some of its primary capabilities:

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Aug 282014
 

Article by Himanshu Arora first posted on http://mylinuxbook.com/

Sometimes a computer system is connected to so many file-systems (in parallel) that managing these connections becomes a complex task. If a user’s work involves interacting with local, external and remote file-systems then he/she would definitely feel a need for a connection management software to manage all the connections centrally.

Looking for a simple connection manager? Try out Gigolo.

gigolo-main

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Linux AIO some of the most common distributions in one ISO

Linux AIO some of the most common distributions in one ISO

Sometimes you want to test or show different GNU/Linux distributions, or just different desktop environment, and in these cases you usually have to put different ISO on CD/DVD or better on USB Sticks and this usually take some time. Luckily now there is a new and nice project that makes the work of testing different […]

Zorin OS 9 Core Review: As good as Linux Mint 17!

Zorin OS 9 Core Review: As good as Linux Mint 17!

While I was looking around for some review of recent linux distribution I found this nice blog: http://mylinuxexplore.blogspot.it/ it’s a blog dedicated to Linux Distro review and for what I’ve read the articles are really well made and accurate, so in short take a look at this great blog by arindam sen. Here I’ve republished his last article […]