Dec 242015
 

Article submitted by Mark

In a market that is churning Android powered device after another Android powered device and the obligatory Apple update to its iPhone and iPad brands, it is no wonder people need to look elsewhere if they want to experience something different in the mobile segment. We aren’t really disrespecting Apple and Google’s efforts mind you, we are just stating that there is an alternative if you want to try out something interesting and different. We are talking about the Linux platform – or to be more specific, the freeware, open source operating system which has slowly but surely been expanding its influence on the mobile segment. This is especially interesting for online gaming enthusiasts who want to try a new and largely “hacker-free” platform. More and more online casinos are supporting Linux alternatives and you can read the casino review of Royal Panda casino here.

For several years the mobile market has had some form of Linux support, most of it was wasted (like that Mozzila smartphone that died and faded away from memory) though some excellent devices that run Ubuntu (the most popular mobile version of the OS) are already making strides. Let’s observe the top 5 mobile devices which run Linux and you can get for a brand new mobile experience.

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Nov 172015
 

Article By Cassie Philips.

Linuxaria has been one of my go-to sources for Linux tips and information ever since I discovered it a couple of months ago. I would strongly suggest reading this post on managing processes with cgroup, as it is an example of the quality of their content.

Linux being one of the quickest rising operating systems available to computers (especially with the privacy debacle that is Windows 10), we are finding that more tools are becoming available to Linux users for their convenience, entertainment and security. A Virtual Private Network (VPN) is one of those services.

What is a VPN, and how does it relate to you? Those are the questions this article is here to answer for you.

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Jul 102015
 

This is a re-post of the original article byJason SkowronskiAmy Echeverri and Sadequl Hussain first posted on http://www.loggly.com

Linux Logging Basics

First we’ll describe the basics of what Linux logs are, where to find them, and how they get created. If you already know this stuff, feel free to skip to the next section.

Linux System Logs

Many valuable log files are automatically created for you by Linux. You can find them in your /var/log directory. Here is what this directory looks like on a typical Ubuntu system:

Linux-system-log-terminal

Some of the most important Linux system logs include:

  • /var/log/syslog or /var/log/messages stores all global system activity data, including startup messages. Debian-based systems like Ubuntu store this in /var/log/syslog. RedHat-based systems like RHEL or CentOS store this in /var/log/messages.
  • /var/log/auth.log or /var/log/secure stores logs from the Pluggable Authentication Module (pam) including successful logins, failed login attempts, and authentication methods. Ubuntu and Debian store authentication messages in /var/log/auth.log. RedHat and CentOS store this data in /var/log/secure.
  • /var/log/kern stores kernel error and warning data, which is particularly helpful for troubleshooting custom kernels.
  • /var/log/cron stores information about cron jobs. Use this data to verify that your cron jobs are running successfully.

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Feb 192015
 

bitdefender-logo

Despite the fact that many might consider Linux as being one of the most secure platforms when it comes to fighting against viruses, the reality is that having a security application for your Linux based computer is very important.

The BitDefender Antivirus Scanner for Unices has been created specifically to protect all persons that run FreeBSD as well as Linux based computers against a variety of threats that might appear in the online world. The application has been designed with versatility and ease of use in mind, and it manages to include complete protection against viruses as well as spyware alike.
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Dec 192014
 

Like every year it’s time once again to read the sysadvent blog, a great source of interesting article.

This one it’s an article of one year ago, but still really useful and interesting

Written by: Michael Stahnke (@stahnma)
Edited by: Adam Compton (@comptona)

Over the years, I have mentored quite a few System Administrators. Levelling up means learning about your tools and what they’re capable of (and not memorizing command line flags). For this year’s article on SysAdvent, I wanted to share a lot about one my favorite tools: yum. When I say yum, I mean a little more than just the yum cli itself, but the ecosystem of tooling around it. I spend a lot of time doing things like package building, package repository management, and all in all hacking around with rpms and yum.

Yum is a tool that you’ve probably used if you been a system administrator for any period of time. It’s also one of those tools that is very easy to use and have it get out of your way. yum does network-based dependency resolution, meaning that if you want to install a package, it will download and install all dependencies of that package as well. These are the basics people often know. Under the hood it uses rpm. In normal operation, you use yum for searching, installation and uninstallation of packages. That’s actually pretty awesome, but mainly the trivial use-case for yum.

Beyond that, however, there is much more to the way yum works and interacts with repository metadata. Sometimes being able to query that data can solve heinous problems easily, rather than coming up with odd workarounds. That information can also help you make good decisions about package management.

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