Jul 132014
 

hardware-pc1.jpg

Sometimes it’s useful to know which components you are using on a GNU/Linux computer or server, you can go with the long way, taking a look at the boot message for all the hardware discovered, use some terminal commands such as lsusb,lspci or lshw or some graphical tools such as hardinfo (my favourite graphical tool) or Inex/CPU-G.

But I’ve discovered on my Linux Mint, that, by default, I’ve now a new option: inxi

inxi it’s a full featured system information script wrote in bash, that easily will show on a terminal all the info of your system.

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Jul 092014
 

Debian6lts
As probably most people know Debian has announced an extended support for Squeeze (AKA Debian 6), so while the “ordinary” support has ended on the 31 may 2014 there is now a Long Term Support (LTS) until the February 2016.
This has been announced by a team of volunteer on April

That’s a great news if you are not able to upgrade your server from Debian 6 to 7 and these are the instructions to do it easily.

Important: Squeeze-LTS will only support i386 and amd64. Users of other architectures are encouraged to upgrade to Debian 7 (“wheezy”).

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Jun 262014
 

Article first published on Urfix’s blog

The SCP protocol is a network protocol, based on the BSD RCP protocol, which supports file transfers between hosts on a network. SCP uses Secure Shell (SSH) for data transfer and utilizes the same mechanisms for authentication, thereby ensuring the authenticity and confidentiality of the data in transit. A client can send (upload) files to a server, optionally including their basic attributes (permissions, timestamps). Clients can also request files or directories from a server (download). SCP runs over TCP port 22 by default. Like RCP, there is no RFC that defines the specifics of the protocol.

SCP is an awesome tool. Learn it, Love it, Use it….
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Jun 242014
 

A not so common guide, article by   first posted on http://www.refining-linux.org

The UNIX philosophy is based on the DRY principle which declares: “Don’t repeat yourself”. Therefore, a program just does what it’s made for and uses libraries or even other programs on your system to do a more advanced job. Some of these auxiliary programs are user definable and probably you already know the EDITOR environment variable, which specifies your default editor for the console. This is used, e.g., for the command visudo, which opens your /etc/sudoers file safely, or by svn to input a commit comment. But another important component is your console pager, which is used to display textual content on the console.

As a system administrator or a more advanced Linux user you surely know man and how to use it. man shows you the (probably localized) contents of your system’s manual pages for a specific command or file, at least you might think so, but actually that’s wrong or let’s say: not completely the truth. man selects which manpage to show, but the display itself is managed by your pager. Of course, not only man makes use of the pager, also commands like mail use it (which might not exist on your system if you don’t have an MTA installed), so this is a very basic program.

I assume, you have already used your pager very often, which is nothing else than more, less or lv (which is also a good pager but very seldom installed by default and therefore rarely known). Most of the time, you use them to display the contents of log files or configurations, which you don’t want to alter, but that’s not all. As mentioned before, other programs use your pager as well and there is a way to configure which one to take and of course also how to use it.

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Jun 162014
 

Tee

The command “tee” it’s one of the basic commands that you should find in any system, yet it’s not so popular or use, this command reads standard input and writes it to both standard output and one or more files, effectively duplicating its input. It is primarily used in conjunction with pipes and filters. The command is named after the T-splitter used in plumbing.

In short if you want to redirect the STDOUT of any command as well as printing it to the screen, tee is the right tool to use, let’s see some practical use of this command.
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