Aug 092014
 

In previous posts we’ve seen how to Enable automatic security update in Debian/Ubuntu and in Red hat enterprise or Centos 6, recently I’ve started to work with the new Red Hat Enterprise 7 and I’ve noticed that there are some interesting changes in the way this system can be set to auto update.

An example ?

In Red Hat/Centos 6 you could not set which kind of update you’d like to do, so you could just decide to update for any kind of update (feature,bug or security) or nothing at all, this has changed and now we can fine grain which kind of updates we want to do on our servers.

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Aug 012014
 

If, like me, you work on terminals connected via ssh to remote computer/server you are probably used to tmux and screen and so it’s not a problem if you have to close your session, as you’ll be able to easily re-connect when you need it, but sometimes you could forget about using one of these utility.

Started a long-running process over ssh, but have to leave and don’t want to interrupt it?
Just start a screen, use reptyr to grab it, and then kill the ssh session and head on home.

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Jul 132014
 

hardware-pc1.jpg

Sometimes it’s useful to know which components you are using on a GNU/Linux computer or server, you can go with the long way, taking a look at the boot message for all the hardware discovered, use some terminal commands such as lsusb,lspci or lshw or some graphical tools such as hardinfo (my favourite graphical tool) or Inex/CPU-G.

But I’ve discovered on my Linux Mint, that, by default, I’ve now a new option: inxi

inxi it’s a full featured system information script wrote in bash, that easily will show on a terminal all the info of your system.

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Jul 092014
 

Debian6lts
As probably most people know Debian has announced an extended support for Squeeze (AKA Debian 6), so while the “ordinary” support has ended on the 31 may 2014 there is now a Long Term Support (LTS) until the February 2016.
This has been announced by a team of volunteer on April

That’s a great news if you are not able to upgrade your server from Debian 6 to 7 and these are the instructions to do it easily.

Important: Squeeze-LTS will only support i386 and amd64. Users of other architectures are encouraged to upgrade to Debian 7 (“wheezy”).

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Jun 262014
 

Article first published on Urfix’s blog

The SCP protocol is a network protocol, based on the BSD RCP protocol, which supports file transfers between hosts on a network. SCP uses Secure Shell (SSH) for data transfer and utilizes the same mechanisms for authentication, thereby ensuring the authenticity and confidentiality of the data in transit. A client can send (upload) files to a server, optionally including their basic attributes (permissions, timestamps). Clients can also request files or directories from a server (download). SCP runs over TCP port 22 by default. Like RCP, there is no RFC that defines the specifics of the protocol.

SCP is an awesome tool. Learn it, Love it, Use it….
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