Jan 192014
 

Article by Rahul Panwar first posted on http://linuxexplore.com/

A chroot on Unix operating systems is an operation that changes the apparent root directory for the current running process and its children. A program that is run in such a modified environment cannot name (and therefore normally not access) files outside the designated directory tree. The term “chroot” may refer to the chroot(2) system call or the chroot(8) wrapper program. The modified environment is called a “chroot jail”. From Wikipedia.

Why it is required? If you want to set up your Linux box as a web hosting server for its users, you may need to give SFTP access. But they can get access to whole system Linux tree, just for reading but still very unsecure. So it is mandatory to lock them in their home directory.

There are many other applications, it’s just a common example, so lets start its configuration.

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Jan 092012
 

If you manage remote machines you have for sure some way to connect to them, to connect to Unix machines I’m used to open a terminal with my favorite terminal emulator (Terminator in these days), and from there ssh to other servers, for Windows RDP protocol as client i use Remmina (perhaps i’ll talk of it in a future article) and for FTP and SFTP i use Filezilla, but i’ve found recently another interesting software that could change my habitudes: PAC Manager, where PAC stand for Perl/Gtk approach to connections managing.

Ah, and i know that the title it’s in broken English, the phrase it comes from an old videogame.
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