Oct 202014
 

linux-image

Guest post by Richard Larson

Linux often seems like a breath of fresh air to Windows users. It’s free. It doesn’t have bloatware issues. You don’t have to pay for it. It has less malware and hacking issues because it’s less profitable and productive for the baddies to concentrate on an operating system with less users.

Did I mention it doesn’t cost anything?

Whatever the reason Linux looks good to you, you have to remember that Linux and Windows are two different animals. Windows is far more professionally polished and noob friendly. (It has to be. You paid for it.) While there are a few supported versions of Windows floating around, most users stick with the one that comes with their machines. On the hand, Linux has so many distributions, it’s hard to keep track sometimes. From the way you install programs to the amount of time you spend in a command prompt screen, it’s a different experience. Whether it’s a good experience or not depends on your preference.

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Aug 262014
 

LinuxAIOSometimes you want to test or show different GNU/Linux distributions, or just different desktop environment, and in these cases you usually have to put different ISO on CD/DVD or better on USB Sticks and this usually take some time. Luckily now there is a new and nice project that makes the work of testing different distributions much more easy: the Linux AIO (All In One) project.

From the Linux AIO website:

Our plan is to bring some of the major Linux distributions (Ubuntu and flavors, Linux Mint (“Debian”), Debian Live) with different desktop environments on one ISO file that can be burnt on one DVD or USB flash drive. Every one of them can be used as Live system, with no need of installation on hard drive or can be eventually installed on computer for full experience.

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Jul 222014
 

ubuntuone out of businessIf you were an Ubuntu One user probably you have received a mail like this one:

“This is the FINAL reminder to make sure you have retrieved all your data from Ubuntu One filesync, as we will be deleting all the content permanently on 31st July 2014. After that date, we will no longer be able to retrieve any of your files.

In order to make it easy for you to retrieve all of your content, we have released a new feature that lets you download all your content at once. Our website (https://one.ubuntu.com/) has been updated with instructions on how to conveniently download all your files.

In addition, you still can use Mover.io’s offer to transfer your data to another cloud provider for free. The Ubuntu One web interface is available for you to download individual files as well.

All of us in the Ubuntu One team would like to thank you for your support over the years.

The Ubuntu One team”

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How to Add a Printer in Ubuntu or Linux Mint with CUPS

How to Add a Printer in Ubuntu or Linux Mint with CUPS

Guest post by Kerry Blake If you are planning to buy a new printer and currently using Ubuntu or Linx Mint, the 2 most popular desktop operating systems, next to Windows and OSX, you should probably buy a printer that can hand shake with your Linux box, out of the box. Computer peripherals like printers, [...]

How to sync your Fitbit under Linux

How to sync your Fitbit under Linux

I’ve recently received a fitbit flex as gift, and I love it, this personal device tracks steps, distance, and calories burned. At night, it tracks your sleep quality and wakes you silently in the morning. Just check out the lights to see how you stack up against your personal goal. Flex allows you to set [...]