Mar 162014
 

fitbit linux
I’ve recently received a fitbit flex as gift, and I love it, this personal device tracks steps, distance, and calories burned. At night, it tracks your sleep quality and wakes you silently in the morning. Just check out the lights to see how you stack up against your personal goal. Flex allows you to set a goal and uses LED lights to show how you’re stacking up. Each light represents 20% of your goal. You choose which one — steps, calories, or distance. It lights up like a scoreboard, challenging you to be more active day after day.

Flex automatically syncs your data to PCs and Macs with Fitbit’s wireless sync dongle (included), many iOS devices and select Android phones without plugging in or pushing buttons. Now all this sound fantastic and really funny if you like to take your stats and see nice graphs, but there is a small (big) problem about fitbit, it doesn’t support officially Linux.

Sure, you can use a compatible smartphone, but in general I like to use the idea of using my Linux computers for anything and with some research and some tests I’ve been able to sync successfully my flex with my Linux Mint 16.
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Mar 132014
 

Guest post by Kerry Blake

We love Linux and we love it for its open source nature, security, and powerful tools. There are a lot of free as well as commercial VPN solutions available for Ubuntu. We are not going to list or rank all the top VPN providers. We don’t necessarily want to rank them simply because users choose their VPN provider based on their personal requirements. If you want an US VPN service, you should look for the best US VPN service that supports OpenVPN. The intent of the article is to help newbies configure and use their favorite VPN service without going back and forth in Ubuntu community forum and embarrass oneself before the rather patronizing users.

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Jan 062014
 

An interesting and detailed howto on apt, first posted on linux mint community tutorials

Intro by Wikipedia:

The Advanced Packaging Tool, or APT, is a free user interface that works with core libraries to handle the installation and removal of software on the Debian GNU/Linux distribution and its variants. APT simplifies the process of managing software on Unix-like computer systems by automating the retrieval, configuration and installation of software packages.

When you launch Software Manager or Update Manager or Synaptic Package Manager, you’re using APT via different GUIs. But you can control APT even via command lines in an easy and quick way.

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SSH in 2 steps on Linux with Google Authenticator

Article by Alessio bash, first published on his blog Many security policies require you to change the port number of the SSH service to ensure greater security in a Linux system. Situation now used throughout the IT world and used mostly by users who have their own private server. Today I want to show you [...]

Interview with Patrick one of the men behind Emmabuntüs

Today I want to present you Emmabuntüs  a Linux distribution derived from Ubuntu and designed to facilitate the repacking of computers donated to Emmaüs Communities. The name itself is a combination of two words: Ubuntu and Emmaüs. Emmabuntüs 2 has been released on July 21 2013 and it’s based on Xubuntu 12.04 LTS, this is because the team want a Long Term support base distribution, [...]