Apr 122015
 

systemd is a suite of system management daemons, libraries, and utilities designed as a central management and configuration platform for the GNU/Linux computer operating system.
It provides a system and service manager that runs as PID 1 and starts the rest of the system as alternative to the traditional sysVinit.
systemd provides aggressive parallelization capabilities, uses socket and D-Bus activation for starting services, offers on-demand starting of daemons,

It’s becoming the standard of all the major GNU/Linux distributions and at the moment it’s the default for Arch Linux, Red Hat Enterprise/Centos (version 7), Fedora, Mageia and Suse Enterprise, it’s planned to be used on Debian 8 and Ubuntu 15.04.

There is a lot of people talking for and against systemd on the net as some see it as too intrusive, complex and against the Unix philosophy to keep things simple and make them do just one task.

Using Red Hat 7 at work and Arch Linux on my laptop I’ve started to use it and I must agree that it’s not so simple in the start, but let’s try to take the good thing from it and in this article I’d like to show you some commands that you can use with systemd to manage the processes on a GNU/Linux system and that I’ve found really useful.
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Mar 012015
 

Quick, what’s the first thing you think about when you hear the term “Linux”? If your answer is among the lines of “old-fashion complicated-to-use operating system that’s anything but user-friendly”, you’re clearly thinking of what Linux used to be, and not about what Linux is today. You see, Linux has come a long way since the old-days, when you needed to be technically-savvy to use it. Linux has gotten better, faster, and more powerful than ever, and 2015 might just be the year Linux takes a serious swing at Microsoft’s domination when it comes to desktop computers. Here’s why.
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Feb 232015
 

Not so long ago, the terms “Linux” and “gaming” had nothing in common. In fact, “Linux” didn’t have much in common with pretty much anything else in the field of entertainment, being considered an operating system for highly skilled individuals (which is just a fancy way of saying it was for geeks and nerds only). However, things have changed a lot lately, and not only did Linux bump up its game and became an operating system that’s quite user-friendly and intuitive, but it is also becoming known as a gaming platform, with more and more games being ported to Linux. One such game is Apotheon, a heroic action game you might want to check out.
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Linux: Timeouting commands in shell scripts

Linux: Timeouting commands in shell scripts

Article by Mikko Ohtamaa first posted on his blog Often you want to automatize something using shell scripting. In a perfect world your script robot works for you without getting tired, without hick-ups, and you can just sit at the front of your desk and sip coffee. Then we enter the real world: Your network […]

An introduction to systemd for CentOS 7

An introduction to systemd for CentOS 7

Article by Stuart Burns first posted on Openlogic.com With Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 released and CentOS version 7 newly unveiled, now is a good time to cover systemd, the replacement for legacy System V (SysV) startup scripts and runlevels. Red Hat-based distributions are migrating to systemd because it provides more efficient ways of managing services and […]